DERINKUYU: AN UNDERGROUND CITY
7 Jun '15

Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

0 Shares

DERINKUYU: AN UNDERGROUND CITY

DERINKUYU: AN UNDERGROUND CITY

In 1963, a simple home renovation in the town of Derinkuyu, Turkey led to an extraordinary discovery when a cave wall was opened, revealing a passageway to an underground city thousands of years old and more than 280 feet deep.

It is said that Derinkuyu could house as many as 20,000 people as well as special areas for their livestock and supplies. It also has several wells drilled that could deliver fresh drinking water to many levels of the city. Derinkuyu would have been a massive undertaking to build for anyone, even in modern times with modern equipment.

A project of this magnitude would have required specific equipment, planning, and knowledge of the terrain’s geological composition. At Derinkuyu, because of the softness of the stone, one would have had to been very careful that was enough pillar strength to support the floors above otherwise there would have been catastrophic cave-ins. What is very interesting is that there is absolutely no evidence of any catastrophic events. So, obviously the builders were extremely clever and knew their material. Even by today’s standards it is an impressive masterpiece of construction. Please click on pictures to activate carousel. To exit, just press the ESC key or click on the X in the upper left corner of carousel.

The question here is why would anyone want to live underground? Why was this underground city built in the first place? The Cappadocia region where Derinkuyu is located was part of the Zoroastrian Empire, which was Persian. The Zoroastrian religion, based on opposing forces of good and evil is widely believed to have influenced both Hinduism and Judeo-Christianity. Scholars say it was founded sometime before the sixth century BC. Its chief God is the creator Ahura Mazda. In the second chapter of the Zoroastrian sacred text, the Vendidad, Ahura Mazda saves mankind from a worldwide environmental disaster. The great prophet, Yima was instructed to build an underground refuge similar to Derinkuyu by the sky God Ahura Mazda.

According to the sacred texts, Yima built a multilevel underground city to protect a select group of people and animals from a global ice age. The Vendidad called this event “the evil winters.” The underground city at Derinkuyu also has an unusual security system: 1,000-pound doors on rollers that allow them to be moved by a single person, but only from the inside. This was a very complex security measure and obviously the inhabitants of the underground city wanted to hide something from the outside.

According to the ancient Zoroastrian texts, Ahura Mazda flew through the sky in a divine chariot and waged war against his eternal enemy Angra Mainyu, the demon of destruction. So, there we have a description of possible “extraterrestrials” with the capability of flight. Is it possible that people searched for shelter in an underground city because of a war?

Was Derinkuyu built to hide from terribly freezing winters or out of fear of an aerial enemy?

Consider this, if you will: Something flies over the underground city at high speed it would not be possible to spot the ventilation shafts. If it were an enemy that was on foot or on horseback it would be easy for them to just close all the ventilation shafts and everyone inside would have to come out for lack of air. During recorded history we know that many different people did, in fact, hide in the underground city of Derinkuyu to escape everything from desert raiders to Roman legions. But, some experts wonder whether such conventional attacks can really explain why Derinkuyu was built in the first place.

 

Your thoughts and comments are welcome.

Pass it On:

Comments

Share your Thoughts

About Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

Similar Great Articles

{ Comments are encouraged }