EYE SCANS AND SPACE STORIES
22 Sep '16

Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

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EYE SCANS AND SPACE STORIES

While awaiting the next cargo and crew arrivals, Expedition 49 is conducting eye and other science experiments. School students are now enjoying these short articles of NASA’s latest experiences in space at the ISS (International Space Station). The learning experience continues.

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Japanese astronaut Takuya Onishi is at work inside the U.S. Destiny laboratory module. Eye detection is part of the research.

Astronauts Kate Rubins and Takuya Onishi are continuing more eye checks today in the middle of day-long orbital plumbing work. Commander Anatoly Ivanishin packed trash in a resupply ship and researched a variety of Earth and space phenomena.

Rubins and Onishi scanned each other’s eyes today using an ultrasound. Doctors on the ground assisted the duo and will use the data to determine how living in space affects vision and the shape of the eye. The pair also participated in the Story Time From Space video series for children demonstrating simple physics experiments.

Onishi spent most of his day replacing parts such as sensors and valves in the bathroom, or the Water and Hygiene Compartment, located in the Tranquility module. Rubins analyzed the quality of the station’s water supply and sampled for microbes, silica and organic material.

Ivanishin, a veteran cosmonaut on his second station mission, is getting the Progress 63 cargo craft ready for departure next month. He transferred cargo and trash to and from the resupply ship then updated the station’s inventory management system. The commander also spent some time exploring new ways to monitor natural disasters, how the digestive system adapts in space and detecting orbital debris and micrometeoroid impacts on the station.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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About Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

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