US AND RUSSIA TARGET OCTOBER MISSIONS
21 Sep '16

Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

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US AND RUSSIA TARGET OCTOBER MISSIONS

After an anomaly was detected during launch preparations for Expedition 50 to join the crew at the International Space Station, preparations are now underway for an October launch of more cargo to ISS.

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NASA astronaut Kate Rubins holds a reference guide during an emergency descent drill aboard the space station. October cargo missions are planned.

The United States and Russia are working to get a pair of cargo ships ready for an October launch schedule to the International Space Station. While the new shipments are being processed, the Expedition 49 crew conducted eye checks, wore carbon dioxide monitors and prepared for a fuel combustion experiment.

The U.S. company Orbital ATK is targeting the October 9-13 time frame for the launch of its sixth Commercial Resupply Services mission to the space station. Its Cygnus spacecraft will be scheduled to launch atop an Antares rocket from Wallops Island, Va., after successfully completing operational milestones and technical reviews.

The next resupply mission will be Oct. 20 when the Progress 65 cargo craft launches from Kazakhstan on a two-day trip to the space station. The new Russian space freighter will replace the Progress 63 after it undocks Oct. 14 from the rear port of the Zvezda service module.

Back on orbit, astronauts Kate Rubins and Takuya Onishi paired up for routine eye exams today with remote support from ground personnel. Rubins, from NASA, also wore personal devices to demonstrate the ability to monitor a crew member’s exposure to carbon dioxide aboard a spacecraft.

Onishi, from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, continued setting up gear to begin the Group Combustion experiment next week. That study will explore how flames fed by fuel droplets spread in microgravity.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


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UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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About Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

Life experienced individual dedicated to providing a venue for everyone who cares to contribute to the human condition, general and specific areas of knowledge to share in the ever-growing, learning process. As a founder of Universal Digest in marketing, research, writing, public relations, website maintenance, innovations and webmaster assistance, I am constantly looking to grow and learn. Contributing authors are welcome here at Universal Digest. https://www.facebook.com/TheUniversalDigest

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