SCIENTISTS STUDY NEW TECHNOLOGY ADAPTATIONS

While scientists study how ISS crew adapts to new tech, astronaut Shane Kimbrough is seen inside his spacesuit during a spacewalk on Jan. 13, 2017.

With new technology installed, scientists are studying how the crew adapts to the changes. The results look promising. 2017 is going to be a most interesting year in research.

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While scientists study how ISS crew adapts to new tech, astronaut Shane Kimbrough is seen inside his spacesuit during a spacewalk on Jan. 13, 2017.

Scientists are researching how International Space Station astronauts adapt to new technology as NASA prepares to send humans beyond low-Earth orbit. Crew members will have to learn how to operate new types of spacecraft and adjust to planetary surfaces with different micro-gravity environments.

As part of this research, Expedition 50 Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson from NASA and Thomas Pesquet from ESA started Monday morning with an interactive test on an iPad. The test is part of the Fine Motor Skills experiment that observes how astronauts interact with new technologies potentially influencing the design of future spaceships, spacesuits and habitats.

Commander Shane Kimbrough worked throughout the day on science hardware. He rebooted a computer on the MERLIN science freezer before swapping hard drives on a device that observes meteors entering Earth’s atmosphere. In the afternoon, Kimbrough videotaped himself reading a children’s book and performing a simple light experiment for school kids on Earth.

The three cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskiy, Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov, worked in the station’s Russian segment on a variety of science and maintenance tasks. The trio explored the human digestion system and collected blood samples for a bone loss study.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


Get weekly video highlights at: http://jscfeatures.jsc.nasa.gov/videoupdate/


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

With all the furor of scientific research, the crew aboard ISS (International Space Station) is conducting such research, daily. This is an ongoing process where future space travel will become possible. Watch for more, as Universal Digest continues to report actual, real, and continuing events.

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APOLLO 20 MISSION – WAS IT REAL?

These are Apollo patches of planned missions 18, 19, and 20 that did not take place.
Did the Apollo 20 mission really happen? This article takes a look at the history of claims that it did.
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These are Apollo patches of planned missions 18, 19, and 20 that did not take place.
Google search for Apollo 20 patches yields much more.
I watched “Aliens on the Moon” on the Destination America channel, yesterday. I must say the two-hour episode was most interesting. I could see where serious research was undertaken, yet one thing stood out that could not be denied. It was still speculative. Until we can get up close to touch, photograph, and explore, it should not be construed as irrefutable evidence.
 
When it got to the part about William Rutledge, I did a little digging…hoax, in my humble opinion (IMHO). Of course, being human, I could be wrong; however, what follows makes me think I am not. The presentation of evidence was professional and compelling, but it was not substantiated beyond the shadow of a doubt. Yes, a search of NASA Apollo mission patches came up positive up to Mission 20; however, no mission was flown past 1972. The claims of finding an alien (named Moona Lisa) in an old, crashed spacecraft, as well as, spacecraft images have been debunked as models. Stanley Kubrick actually took pictures of the Apollo 11 spacecraft interior and could have been used in the production of the Apollo 20 mission claims.
The Saturn V was the only rocket booster capable of freeing man and materiel past earth orbit. 1 was used to lift Skylab into orbit and 12 were used for the manned moon missions. Except for Apollo 13, which had to abort due to an oxygen module explosion, missions 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 did successfully land on the moon.
The launch of a Saturn V rocket could be heard and seen for miles around. Further, a launch from Vandenberg AFB from the California central coast would have raised eyebrows of many area inhabitants. Vandenberg AFB does launch more satellites into orbit than the Kennedy Space Center; however, its facility has not and is not adapted for the launch of such a large vehicle.
The following is a video of the Apollo 8 launch:

The concept that we could have so secretly sent a three man crew is beyond the words fantastic and believable. NASA astronaut, Leona Snyder is determined as fictitious after extended searches, I could find no evidence of her existence. Alexei Leonov is now 82 years of age and has quite a remarkable history. Although, he was busy in 1975 linking Russian space craft with the Americans in earth orbit, his activities in no way show where he was on the moon in 1976. 
On one of my trips to Cape Canaveral, Florida, in the summer of 1991, I found present assessments of why we did not continue the moon missions was mostly financial…NASA had no money and the morale of personnel was quite low. Upon query about alien artifacts or other evidence being found, the response was consistent. Nothing had been found and they hoped it would be different.
 
Now, in 2017, we are still viewing quite speculative videos in TV media. What amazes me is how the sensationalism prevails over concrete evidence. If it were not for my personal observations, I’d be so done with this stuff. If it is entertainment over evidence the public desires, then, what may come of all this?
 
Further, what will happen if it turns out proof we are not alone becomes fact. Although, it would not faze me in the least, I contend that the prevalent consideration of worldwide panic would be more correct.
* Please note: Click on black, highlighted links above to view source material.
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HTV CARGO SHIP LEAVES SPACE STATION

The Japanese HTV 6 resupply ship is pictured just before its release on astronaut Shane Kimbrough’s 100th day in space. Credit: @Astro_Kimbrough

After a week of preparation (detailed below), the HTV 6 Japanese cargo ship was released from the space station headed to a location over the Pacific ocean to safely burn up with 4.5 tons of trash on February 5th, 2017.

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The Japanese HTV 6 resupply ship is pictured just before its release on astronaut Shane Kimbrough’s 100th day in space. Credit: @Astro_Kimbrough

Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA commanded the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to release a Japanese cargo vehicle at 10:46 a.m. EST. At the time of release, the station was flying 261 statute miles above the south Atlantic Ocean. Earlier, ground controllers used the robotic arm to unberth the cargo craft.

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA’s) H-II Transport Vehicle-6 (HTV-6) arrived to the space station December 13th, after launching from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan December 9th.

The cargo ship will now move to a safe distance below and in front of the station for about a week’s worth of data gathering with a JAXA experiment designed to measure electromagnetic forces using a tether in low-Earth orbit. JAXA is scheduled to deorbit the craft on Feb. 5. Loaded with trash, the vehicle will burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

Earlier, European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet and Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA commanded the 57.7-foot-long robotic arm to release Kounotori back into orbit. After the HTV supports science experiments for a week, Japanese flight controllers will command the craft to deorbit on Feb. 5 for a fiery reentry into Earth’s atmosphere.

Astronauts Thomas Pesquet (left) and Shane Kimbrough pose for a portrait with Japan’s HTV 6 resupply ship orbiting a short distance away from the space station’s cupola on Dec. 13, 2016.

The Japanese HTV 6 resupply ship was packed and made ready for its release Friday from the International Space Station. European astronaut Thomas Pesquet will command the Canadarm2 to release the HTV-6 at 10:30 a.m. EST. Afterward, it will enter Earth’s atmosphere for a fiery disposal over the Pacific Ocean. NASA TV will broadcast the release and departure activities live beginning at 10 a.m.

More eye exams were on the Expedition 50 crew’s timeline today to ensure the astronauts maintain good vision and help researchers understand the effects of microgravity on eyesight. The space residents used typical optometry instruments to look at the retina and the interior back of the eye.

The crew also worked on maintenance tasks throughout the orbital laboratory. Gear used to analyze particles in the space station’s atmosphere was replaced after a failure was detected in a spectrometer device. Water samples were also collected from the station’s life support systems for quality checks and analysis on the ground. The next SpaceX Dragon mission is due to return these samples and other cargo back to Earth after a launch date is announced.

The six-person Expedition 50 crew poses for a group portrait inside the Columbus lab module from the European Space Agency. (Top row from left) Flight Engineers Thomas Pesquet, Peggy Whitson and Oleg Novitskiy. (Bottom row from left) Flight Engineer Andrey Borisenko, Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryzhikov.

For more information about the International Space Station, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/station.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Please note: When multiple articles are published regarding singular/similar events during a specific time period, Universal Digest will combine detail into one article. This is still mostly unedited material written by the same author.

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FLUID STUDIES IN SPACE BENEFIT ALL

As fluid shift research continues, Expedition 50 flight engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) juggles a set of video cameras in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

Ongoing research in science and experimentation continues aboard the International Space Station. Today’s focus in on fluid shifts in micro-gravity environments.

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As fluid shift research continues, Expedition 50 flight engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) juggles a set of video cameras in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

The Expedition 50 crew members explored a variety of space phenomena today to help researchers improve life for humans and stimulate children’s curiosity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Scientists are working to understand how fluids behave not just in spacecraft fuel tanks and containers but also inside an astronaut’s body. Micro-gravity creates a head-ward flow of fluids that increases pressure on the back of an astronaut’s eyes potentially causing damage and affecting vision.

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson and her Soyuz crewmates Oleg Novitskiy and Sergey Ryzhikov explored the effectiveness of a suit that may reverse these upward fluid shifts. Whitson and Novitskiy used a combination of eye exams and ultrasound artery scans on Ryzhikov today while he wore the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) suit today. The LBNP may offset the microgravity-induced fluid shifts possibly reducing the risk of vision changes in space.

Commander Shane Kimbrough reached out to schoolchildren this morning reading a story book and videotaping a simple fluids experiment. The Story Time From Space series seeks to increase science literacy by engaging students and teachers.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

In addition, Universal Digest wishes our space explorers well. We salute the bravery of each person who takes part in our future of exploration and colonization of our solar system and beyond. Thank you, each and every one of you and thank you, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) for your continued efforts. Godspeed.

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