NEW SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ACTIVATED ON ISS

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft is seen Feb. 23, 2017, loaded with science experiments to be activated, during final approach to the International Space Station.

The SpaceX Dragon supply ship that launched for the first time from Cape Kennedy in Florida brought new science experiments to the space station. They have now been activated.

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SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft is seen Feb. 23, 2017, loaded with science experiments to be activated, during final approach to the International Space Station.

The Expedition 50 crew activated new science experiments delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon. The various life science studies will study bones and muscles, stem cells, botany and protein crystals.

Rodents delivered aboard Dragon were placed in their habitats over the weekend for the Rodent Research-4 study. That experiment is observing how bone and tissue regenerate in microgravity.

Stem cells were also unloaded from Dragon and stowed in a science freezer. The crew will research the replication of stem cells which may benefit clinical trials on Earth for new disease treatments. Astronaut Peggy Whitson used a specialized microscope to view the stem cells as the experiment got under way over the weekend.

The crew is also exploring how plants grow in space in order to provide food and oxygen for future long-duration missions. Plant samples were removed from a science freezer and placed in the Veggie facility for growth and observation. The spaceflight environment can change a plant’s genetic expression and growth pattern.

High-quality crystals are being grown on the International Space Station that otherwise couldn’t be grown on Earth due to gravity. The crystal samples are being studied for the Light Microscopy Module Biophysics-1 experiment to help researchers design new disease-fighting drugs.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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PROGRESS66 DOCKS WITH SPACE STATION

Today’s arrival of the Progress 66 cargo craft, just 24 hours after the capture ofthe Space X Dragon, makes four spaceships at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Progress66 cargo ship has docked with the International Space Station just twenty-four hours after the SpaceX Dragon supply ship is captured and attached to the Harmony module. Now comes the unloading of important science, research, maintenance and crew supplies.

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Today’s arrival of the Progress66 cargo craft, just 24 hours after the capture ofthe Space X Dragon, makes four spaceships at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Traveling about 250 miles over the south Pacific, the un-piloted Progress66 Russian cargo ship docked at 3:30 a.m. EST to the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station.

For more information about the current crew and the International Space Station, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/station.

The SpaceX Dragon was successfully installed to the Harmony module a few hours after it was captured with the Canadarm2. Credit: NASA

The following is detail of the Dragon docking procedure:

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was berthed to the Harmony module of the International Space Station at 8:12 a.m. EST. The hatch between the newly arrived spacecraft and the Harmony module of the space station is scheduled to be opened this afternoon. The capsule will spend about four weeks attached to the station.

For an overview of the science delivered to station aboard Dragon, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/SX10_science

With Dragon now berthed to station, the Expedition 50 crew will focus on its next cargo delivery, which is scheduled to arrive in less than 24 hours. The Russian Progress66 was launched on Wednesday, Feb. 22 from Kazakhstan. It will arrive on station Friday morning for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. EST and remain on the station until June. NASA Television will cover its arrival beginning at 2:45 a.m. EST.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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ASTRONAUTS CAPTURE DRAGON WITH ROBOTIC ARM

The SpaceX Dragon is pictured in the grips of the Canadarm2 shortly after its capture by astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet. Credit: NASA TV

Astronauts aboard ISS (International Space Station) have captured the Dragon cargo ship after gaining a solution to a GPS location issue. The capture occurred almost a day later than planned. Next is the procedures beginning the process of receiving the Progress 66 supply ship launched on Wednesday.

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The SpaceX Dragon is pictured in the grips of the Canadarm2 shortly after its capture by astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet. Credit: NASA TV

While the International Space Station was traveling about 250 statute miles over the west coast of Australia, Expedition 50 Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA and Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) captured Dragon a few minutes ahead of schedule at 5:44 a.m. EST.

NASA Television coverage of installation will begin at 8 a.m. Watch online at www.nasa.gov/live.

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Dragon on Twitter, follow @Space_Station and use #Dragon. For more information about the SpaceX CRS-10 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/spacex.

Earlier today, preparations were made to capture the Dragon cargo ship with the robotic arm.

The SpaceX Dragon resupply ship is pictured arriving in April, 2014 before capture during Expedition 39.

The International Space Station and SpaceX Dragon flight control teams are proceeding toward rendezvous and grapple of an unpiloted Dragon cargo craft on Thursday, Feb. 23. NASA Television coverage has begun. Watch live at http://www.nasa.gov/live.

Grapple is expected around 6 a.m. Installation of the Dragon to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin a couple hours later. NASA TV coverage of installation is set to begin at 8 a.m.

The Dragon launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19. During the initial scheduled rendezvous on Wednesday morning, the spacecraft’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, which triggered an automatic wave off.

SpaceX CRS-10 is scheduled to deliver about 5,500 pounds of supplies and payloads to the station, including critical materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 50 and 51.

Preparations are being made for the next capture of the Progress 66 cargo ship that has launched from Kazakhstan.

The SpaceX Dragon was pictured from a video camera as it approached the space station Wednesday morning before its planned capture.

NASA and SpaceX flight controllers in Houston and Hawthorne, California are reworking plans for the arrival Thursday of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft after its rendezvous to the International Space Station was aborted early Wednesday morning. The Dragon’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, triggering an automatic wave off.

Dragon was sent on a “racetrack” trajectory in front of, above and behind the station for a second rendezvous attempt Thursday.  Dragon is in excellent shape and neither the crew nor the station were in any danger.  NASA TV will cover its second rendezvous attempt Thursday beginning at 4 a.m. EST.

Expedition 50 commander Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet will be back in the cupola Thursday waiting to capture Dragon at around 6 a.m. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will be assisting the duo monitoring Dragon’s arrival and its systems.

A few hours before Dragon aborted its rendezvous, Russia launched its Progress 66 (66P) resupply ship from Kazakhstan on a two-day trip to the station’s Pirs docking compartment. The 66P is carrying nearly three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the six-member Expedition 50 crew. It will arrive Friday for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. and stay at the station until June. NASA TV will also cover its arrival starting at 2:45 a.m.

The following is an article insert from earlier regarding the Dragon cargo ship and its contents:

The International Space Station and SpaceX Dragon flight control teams are proceeding toward rendezvous and grapple of an unpiloted Dragon cargo craft on Thursday, Feb. 23. NASA Television coverage has begun. Watch live at http://www.nasa.gov/live.

Grapple is expected around 6 a.m. Installation of the Dragon to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin a couple hours later. NASA TV coverage of installation is set to begin at 8 a.m.

The Dragon launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19. During the initial scheduled rendezvous on Wednesday morning, the spacecraft’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, which triggered an automatic wave off.

SpaceX CRS-10 is scheduled to deliver about 5,500 pounds of supplies and payloads to the station, including critical materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 50 and 51.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Please note: When multiple articles are published regarding singular/similar events during a specific time period, Universal Digest will combine detail into one article. This is still mostly unedited material written by the same author.

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CALIFORNIA BLOOD SHORTAGE

Central CA Blood Center, 1515 S. Mooney Blvd., Visalia, CA 93277

On a recent visit to donate blood to the local Central California Blood Center, I saw a friend who I had not seen since I had been involved with Chamber of Commerce community activities. Carmella Lamb is the Supervisor for the Central California Blood Center. We had a chance to visit. Darla Silvera, the South Valley Donor Recruiter, joined us in Carmella’s office to discuss our mini-reunion, as well as, enlighten me on what has been happening with area blood supplies. My jaw dropped. I offered to publish this article to share with readers in the region.

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Central CA Blood Center, 1515 S. Mooney Blvd., Visalia, CA 93277

First of all, blood supplies in Central California (and statewide) have been critical for all the time I can remember. As of late, matters have become much worse. Notwithstanding, donations are down. This is not new. However, for some societal reasons, the donation rate has continued to decline. This occurrence is exacerbated by a continually growing population. More reasons for this emergency follows.

During the flu season in winter months, donors who are ill cannot donate until they are well. Of course, anyone who is sick during the year must wait until the cold or other infirmity has passed. What makes this year of blood donations fall even further is this year’s flu outbreak is worse than usual.

Then came the Zika virus problem this past year. Although, the virus has been reported in many areas of the United States, none had been found in this region, at the time of our discussion. Yet, the CDC required all the blood centers to test the blood supply, nationally. Unfortunately, this caused much of the existing blood in storage to be destroyed in the testing process. This has obviously reduced existing supplies available to area hospitals and medical centers even further.

Because of these recent events, blood supplies have been imported from other areas of the United States at great cost to cover life-threatening emergencies.

The result is the real possibility of people in life-endangered situations not being able to receive necessary blood in the proper type. In sum, some may die because they do not receive infusion quickly enough. Synthetic research and applications are still in infancy and is not a viable option for now.

I cannot emphasize enough how critical this emergency is. Everyone who can donate, who wishes and chooses to do so is more appreciated now, than ever. I have made a point of donating every two months because my eyes have been opened wide. Technically, one, on average can donate once every 56 days.

For those who are new to the concept of donating blood, here is a brief overview of the procedure. There is a short screening of the donor where blood pressure, pulse rate, temperature, and iron levels are measured. There is also a brief questionnaire to determine if the donor may have traveled to affected areas, especially overseas. Surprising as it may seem to some, most donors of all persuasions and locales do provide disease-free blood, so don’t be shy if you think your life-style may not fit. This is professionally considered and all are well received. Oh, and do not forget that you get to rest and relax with goodies like fruit drinks, pastries, and other delectable delights. For those on a more strict schedule, the entire time from start to finish may take no more than thirty minutes. For someone like me who loves people and likes to socialize, it could take an hour or more, wink, wink.

In conclusion, all blood types are in critical need, at this time. Please help if you can or wish.

Just remember this: Your choice now to donate blood may very well result is saving someone else’s life! I, for one, want to live on knowing I did something to help others in the human condition.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this article. It is someone’s blessing, somewhere, and you can help.

UNIVERSAL DIGEST

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