RESUPPLY SHIPS KEEP CREW BUSY
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11 Jul '18

Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

The goal of Universal Digest is to publish in areas of ufology, space, science, history, world, regional, and some local news and events. Experiencer, telepathic, and paranormal subject matter are also published. To date, there are over 20 menus from which to choose. Universal Digest is dedicated to elevating the human condition. From over 30 years of research and writing in a number of areas, delivering the message is the purpose.

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RESUPPLY SHIPS KEEP CREW BUSY

Resupply ships on the space station have been keeping the crew quite busy. Cygnus is about ready to release for earth return and the Progress 70 resupply ship is ready to be unpacked.

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The Russian Progress 70 cargo resupply craft approaches the space station’s Pirs docking compartment.

Russia’s Progress 70 (70P) cargo craft delivered nearly 5,700 pounds of crew supplies and station cargo to the International Space Station on Monday less than four hours after launch. Meanwhile, the U.S. Cygnus resupply ship from Northrop Grumman tested its ability to boost the orbital laboratory’s altitude today.

Monday’s arrival of the Russian resupply craft set a milestone for station operations by arriving with its cargo in just 3 hours and 40 minutes, or only two Earth orbits. The new Progress makes six spacecraft parked at the orbital complex including the Progress 69 resupply ship, the Soyuz MS-08 and MS-09 crew ships and the SpaceX Dragon and Northrop Grumman Cygnus space freighters.

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There are now three resupply ships docked on ISS.

The engine on Northrup Grumman’s Cygnus cargo ship fired for 50 seconds Tuesday at 4:25 p.m. EDT to reboost the station in a test designed to verify an additional capability to adjust the station’s altitude, if required. The brief engine firing raised the station’s altitude by about 295 feet. Cygnus will depart the station on Sunday after delivering several tons of supplies and science experiments back in May for the six crewmembers on board.

Astronauts Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Alexander Gerst continued more life science work today exploring cancer research and fertility. Serena split her time today between testing ways to develop safer, more effective cancer therapies and exploring how living in space impacts fertility. Gerst set up a specialized microscope to look at proteins that could be used for cancer treatment and radiation protection.

Earlier in the day:

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Expedition 56-57 crewmates (from left) Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA; Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency); and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos. Just before, the Progress 70 resupply ship docked with ISS.

Traveling about 250 miles over the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand, the unpiloted Russian Progress 70 cargo ship docked at 9:31 p.m. EDT to the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station.


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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About Ed Smith - Founder - Universal Digest

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The goal of Universal Digest is to publish in areas of ufology, space, science, history, world, regional, and some local news and events. Experiencer, telepathic, and paranormal subject matter are also published. To date, there are over 20 menus from which to choose. Universal Digest is dedicated to elevating the human condition. From over 30 years of research and writing in a number of areas, delivering the message is the purpose.

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