IMMUNITY STUDIES AND SPACEX LAUNCH

While immunity studies continue aboard ISS the SpaceX Dragon launch on the Falcon 9 rocket was delayed due to a drone ship power issue. The launch occurred in the last 15 hours.

IMMUNITY STUDIES CONTINUE AFTER SPACEX LAUNCH

Immunity studies continue while the ISS crew prepare for the arrival of the SpaceX Dragon supply ship with a minor delay with the launch.

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NASA reported the launch of the Dragon supply ship to the International Space Station after a 15 hour delay. Science and immunity studies continue. The crew is practicing to receive the supply ship upon its arrival.

SpaceX launched just 15 hours ago. More than 5,500 pounds of cargo is on its way to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. The company’s 17th commercial cargo mission to resupply the space station began at 2:48 a.m. EDT on May 4, 2019, with liftoff aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral.

MISSION LAUNCH DELAY

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While immunity studies continue aboard ISS the SpaceX Dragon launch on the Falcon 9 rocket was delayed due to a drone ship power issue. The launch occurred in the last 15 hours.

This morning’s SpaceX Dragon launch was scrubbed due to a drone ship power issue. Launch coverage for the next attempt begins at 2:30 a.m. EDT Saturday, May 4, for a 2:48 a.m. launch. Viewers can watch it unfold on NASA Television and the agency’s website. This cargo delivery will replenish the International Space Station with nearly 5,500 pounds of science, supplies and hardware.

Today, onboard the space station, in addition to routine maintenance and housekeeping, mice are keeping the astronauts aboard busy with the Rodent Research-12 investigation. While David Saint-Jacques was occupied cleaning habitats and cameras and restocking food, Nick Hague, in addition to Flight Engineers Anne McClain and Christina Koch, spent time calibrating Mass Measurement Devices and establishing baseline readings.

TRAINING ABOARD SPACE STATION

Saint-Jacques and Hague spent some time to reviewing training and procedures for when they command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to capture the Dragon cargo craft at the International Space Station, which is now scheduled for Monday, May 6, at 7 a.m. following a May 4 launch.

Mice could be key to studying immunity responses in humans. Spaceflight is known to affect immunity, but there’s little research that has been conducted to see how, in fact, humans would respond to a challenge to the body’s immunity in space. Since a mouse’s immune system parallels that of humans, these animal models enable us to learn and understand how astronaut health can be sustained in microgravity.

Written By: Catherine Williams NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Universal Digest is committed to providing its audience with the most timely news reporting; however, there are times where this is not possible. Therefore, a concise reporting of historical news occurrences are published, as soon as, is practicable.

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Crew Studies Space Impacts on Humans and Tech

Astronaut Peggy Whitson

Astronaut Peggy Whitson was pictured June 28 conducting a live video interview with reporters on Earth.

Crew space studies continue aboard the International Space Station, this week.

Expedition 52 continued exploring today how microgravity impacts humans and technology to improve future spaceflight and benefit life on Earth. The trio also conducted an array of maintenance activities including space plumbing.

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson took a look today at how living in space affects her ability to work on interactive tasks. The Fine Motor Skills study, which has been taking place for over two years, is researching the skills necessary for astronauts to interact with next-generation space technologies. Observations may impact the design of future spacecraft, spacesuits and habitats.

Jack Fischer, a first time space flyer from NASA, wrapped up operations with the Group Combustion Module experiment today. The combustion study was exploring how flames spread as the composition of fuel changes in space. Results could benefit the development of advanced rocket engines and improve cleaner, more efficient engines on Earth.

Whitson and Fischer also worked on a variety of plumbing tasks including collecting water samples and swapping and filling recycle tanks on the Urine Processing Assembly. Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin connected power and network cables before moving on to activating an antenna and more plumbing work.

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Crew aboard the International Space Station continue space research this week.

Crew members continue to train on earth for their upcoming trip to ISS.


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit; we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Universal Digest is committed to providing its audience with the most timely news reporting; however, there are times where this is not possible. Therefore, a concise reporting of historical news occurrences are published, as soon as, is practicable.

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NEW CREW LAUNCH TO SPACE STATION

The Soyuz MS-02 rocket launches with new crew on time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV

The latest crew to join the others on the International Space Station has launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan after a technical glitch that delayed the flight for most of a month.

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The Soyuz MS-02 rocket launches with new crew on time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV

The Soyuz MS-02 launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 4:05 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 19 (2:05 p.m. Baikonur time). At the time of launch, the space station was flying 252 statute miles over the south Atlantic, east of Brazil. NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos are now safely in orbit.

Over the next two days, the trio will orbit the Earth 34 times before docking to the space station’s Poisk module at 5:59 a.m. Friday, Oct. 21. NASA TV coverage of the docking will begin at 5:15 a.m.

NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov are shown below before embarking aboard the Soyuz spaceship.

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Expedition 49-50 crew members (from left) Shane Kimbrough, Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko for a picture after the conclusion of a crew press conference Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

The Soyuz MS-02 rocket is shown below being prepared for upcoming launch on October 16, 2016. Across the world the Orbital ATK Antares rocket launched from Wallops Flight Center, Virginia on its 6-day trek to the space station.

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The gantry arms are raised around the Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft after it was raised into a vertical position on the launch pad, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

To learn more about the International Space Station, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/station. For launch coverage and more information about the mission, visit: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/. Get breaking news, images and features from the station on Instagram at: http://instagram.com/iss and on Twitter @Space_Station.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public. Please note that parts of three articles with images have been inserted above to cover the latest crew launch event and space station journey updates.

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ISS CREW AWAITS NEW ARRIVALS

The Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome with Expedition 48-49 crew members Kate Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin and Takuya Onishi onboard. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Scientific experiments and operations continue aboard ISS (International Space Station) while the crew awaits the arrival of the next expedition of astronauts.

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The Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome with Expedition 48-49 crew members Kate Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin and Takuya Onishi onboard. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

A new set of Expedition 48 crew members is on its way to the International Space Station after launching Wednesday night (Thursday morning Baikonur time) aboard the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft. The trio from Japan, Russia and the United States will arrive at their new home in space early Saturday morning for a four-month stay.

Veteran cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin is commanding the Soyuz spacecraft that is carrying him and first time astronauts Kate Rubins and Takuya Onishi to the orbital laboratory. They will dock to the Rassvet module Saturday at 12:12 a.m. EDT, open the hatches about two-and-a-half hours later and begin a mission scheduled to last until October. NASA TV will cover the docking activities beginning at 11:30 p.m.

While they wait for the new arrivals, Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineers Oleg Skripochka and Alexey Ovchinin are keeping up science operations and lab maintenance work. They have been aboard the station since March 18 and are due to return to Earth in September.

Williams installed gear in the Japanese Kibo lab module today for a new life science experiment set to arrive on the next SpaceX mission. Next he configured an observation rack in the U.S. lab module that will collect imagery of meteor showers pictured from space.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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