ASTRONAUTS CAPTURE DRAGON WITH ROBOTIC ARM

The SpaceX Dragon is pictured in the grips of the Canadarm2 shortly after its capture by astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet. Credit: NASA TV

Astronauts aboard ISS (International Space Station) have captured the Dragon cargo ship after gaining a solution to a GPS location issue. The capture occurred almost a day later than planned. Next is the procedures beginning the process of receiving the Progress 66 supply ship launched on Wednesday.

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The SpaceX Dragon is pictured in the grips of the Canadarm2 shortly after its capture by astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet. Credit: NASA TV

While the International Space Station was traveling about 250 statute miles over the west coast of Australia, Expedition 50 Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA and Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) captured Dragon a few minutes ahead of schedule at 5:44 a.m. EST.

NASA Television coverage of installation will begin at 8 a.m. Watch online at www.nasa.gov/live.

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Dragon on Twitter, follow @Space_Station and use #Dragon. For more information about the SpaceX CRS-10 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/spacex.

Earlier today, preparations were made to capture the Dragon cargo ship with the robotic arm.

The SpaceX Dragon resupply ship is pictured arriving in April, 2014 before capture during Expedition 39.

The International Space Station and SpaceX Dragon flight control teams are proceeding toward rendezvous and grapple of an unpiloted Dragon cargo craft on Thursday, Feb. 23. NASA Television coverage has begun. Watch live at http://www.nasa.gov/live.

Grapple is expected around 6 a.m. Installation of the Dragon to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin a couple hours later. NASA TV coverage of installation is set to begin at 8 a.m.

The Dragon launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19. During the initial scheduled rendezvous on Wednesday morning, the spacecraft’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, which triggered an automatic wave off.

SpaceX CRS-10 is scheduled to deliver about 5,500 pounds of supplies and payloads to the station, including critical materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 50 and 51.

Preparations are being made for the next capture of the Progress 66 cargo ship that has launched from Kazakhstan.

The SpaceX Dragon was pictured from a video camera as it approached the space station Wednesday morning before its planned capture.

NASA and SpaceX flight controllers in Houston and Hawthorne, California are reworking plans for the arrival Thursday of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft after its rendezvous to the International Space Station was aborted early Wednesday morning. The Dragon’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, triggering an automatic wave off.

Dragon was sent on a “racetrack” trajectory in front of, above and behind the station for a second rendezvous attempt Thursday.  Dragon is in excellent shape and neither the crew nor the station were in any danger.  NASA TV will cover its second rendezvous attempt Thursday beginning at 4 a.m. EST.

Expedition 50 commander Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet will be back in the cupola Thursday waiting to capture Dragon at around 6 a.m. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will be assisting the duo monitoring Dragon’s arrival and its systems.

A few hours before Dragon aborted its rendezvous, Russia launched its Progress 66 (66P) resupply ship from Kazakhstan on a two-day trip to the station’s Pirs docking compartment. The 66P is carrying nearly three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the six-member Expedition 50 crew. It will arrive Friday for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. and stay at the station until June. NASA TV will also cover its arrival starting at 2:45 a.m.

The following is an article insert from earlier regarding the Dragon cargo ship and its contents:

The International Space Station and SpaceX Dragon flight control teams are proceeding toward rendezvous and grapple of an unpiloted Dragon cargo craft on Thursday, Feb. 23. NASA Television coverage has begun. Watch live at http://www.nasa.gov/live.

Grapple is expected around 6 a.m. Installation of the Dragon to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin a couple hours later. NASA TV coverage of installation is set to begin at 8 a.m.

The Dragon launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Sunday, Feb. 19. During the initial scheduled rendezvous on Wednesday morning, the spacecraft’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, which triggered an automatic wave off.

SpaceX CRS-10 is scheduled to deliver about 5,500 pounds of supplies and payloads to the station, including critical materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 50 and 51.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


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SPACEX DRAGON GPS ISSUE AND LAUNCHES

SpaceX Dragon cargo ship is waved off due to GPS issue.

The SpaceX Dragon supply ship had a GPS location value issue, docking with ISS was delayed. Later in the article the launches of Progress 66 from Kazakhstan and Falcon 9 with Dragon are covered here.

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SpaceX Dragon cargo ship is waved off due to GPS issue.

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft waved off its planned rendezvous with the International Space Station at 3:25 a.m. EST. Onboard computers triggered the abort after recognizing an incorrect value in GPS data issue about the location of the space station. Per the re-rendezvous plan built into every mission, the spacecraft automatically reset for another rendezvous and docking attempt in 24 hours.

The spacecraft is in excellent shape with no issues, and the crew aboard the space station is safe. With the GPS issue resolved the next rendezvous attempt is targeted for Thursday morning. NASA TV coverage will begin at 4 a.m. with grapple expected around 6 a.m. Installation coverage will begin at 8 a.m. Watch live on NASA TV and online at: http://www.nasa.gov/live.

Written By: M C Summer NASA


Earlier, the Russian Progress 66 cargo ship safely lifted off from Kazakhstan on Wednesday.

A GPS issue arose after the Russian Progress 66 launched at 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The un-piloted Russian Progress 66 launched at 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It is now orbiting the planet on course for the International Space Station

The vehicle will deliver almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the Expedition 50 crew.

The spacecraft is set to dock to the PIRS docking compartment at 3:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24. NASA TV coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin at 2:45 a.m. Progress 66 will remain docked at the station for almost four months before departing in June for its return into Earth’s atmosphere.

This was the first launch of a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur since the Progress 65 supply craft was lost Dec. 1, 2016.

Earlier in the week, SpaceX launched the Dragon spaceship from Pad 39 at Kennedy Space Center, in Florida. The Falcon 9 launch vehicle successfully returned to its designated landing pad.

Before the GPS issue, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is the company’s 10th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 9:39 a.m. EST from the historic launch site now operated by SpaceX under a property agreement with NASA.

The SpaceX tenth commercial resupply mission lifted off at 9:39 a.m. EST on Sunday, Feb. 19. The rocket launched from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This was the first commercial launch from Kennedy’s historic pad.

Astronauts Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Shane Kimbrough of NASA will use the space station’s robotic arm to capture Dragon when it arrives at the station. Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 on NASA TV and the agency’s website, with installation coverage set to begin at 8:30 a.m.

Meanwhile, the unpiloted Russian Progress 66 is scheduled for 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The spacecraft is set to dock to the Pirs docking compartment at 3:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24.

Aboard the station, the crew continued preparations for the arrival of the vehicles and set up several scientific experiments and technology demonstrations.

The Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) was installed for a technical evaluation. MED-2 aims to demonstrate if small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions.

Written By: D Huot NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Please note: When multiple articles are published regarding singular/similar events during a specific time period, Universal Digest will combine detail into one article. This is still mostly unedited material written by the same author.

Related authors of same organization publishing on singular/similar events may be posted in same Universal Digest article. Content will be individually indicated for each author.

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