Station Kicks off Week with Solar Array Study and Biological Research

The new ROSA or Roll Out Solar Array is shown here attached to Canadarm2.
Roll Out Solar Array
The new ROSA or Roll Out Solar Array is shown here attached to Canadarm2.

The Roll Out Solar Array, also known as ROSA, was deployed June 18 from the tip of the Canadarm2.

Robotics controllers completed the unloading and set up of the third and final external experiment delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship. Inside the International Space Station, the Expedition 52 crew studied a variety of life science including plant growth, bone loss and cardiac biology.

Over the weekend, engineers on the ground remotely operated the Canadarm2 to extract the Roll Out Solar Array from Dragon.  The experiment, also known as ROSA, will remain attached to the Canadarm2 over seven days to test the effectiveness of the advanced, flexible solar array that rolls out like a tape measure.

Flight Engineer Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson set up the Seedling Growth-3 botany study today that is researching how plant cells respond to lighting conditions in microgravity. Fischer also installed samples in a NanoRacks facility for an educational research project that is studying the effects of radiation damage on synthetic DNA.

Whitson measured bone loss in mice for the Rodent Research-5 study. Results may improve the health of astronauts living in space and humans on Earth with bone diseases. Whitson later moved onto the Cardiac Stem Cells experiment that seeks to understand the accelerated aging process that takes place in space.


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit; we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

Universal Digest is committed to providing its audience with the most timely news reporting; however, there are times where this is not possible. Therefore, a concise reporting of historical news occurrences are published, as soon as, is practicable.

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CYGNUS WITH SOLAR ARRAYS ON WAY TO ISS

The Cygnus spacecraft and its solar arrays are displayed in this computer representation. Credit: NASA TV

After some weather delays, the Orbital ATK Antares rocket launched without an issue carrying Cygnus that successfully deployed its solar arrays.

The following is a computer rendition of Cygnus with its solar arrays deployed for trip to ISS.

og: image
The Cygnus spacecraft and its solar arrays are displayed in this computer representation. Credit: NASA TV

The cargo ship will rendezvous with the International Space Station on Sunday, Oct. 23. It will be grappled at approximately 7:05 a.m. by Expedition 49 Flight Engineers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Kate Rubins of NASA. After Cygnus’ capture, ground controllers will command the station’s arm to rotate and install it on the bottom of the station’s Unity module. It is scheduled depart the space station on Nov. 18.

Science investigations aboard Cygnus on their way to the space station also include commercial and academic payloads in myriad disciplines, including:

  • Saffire II, the second in a series of experiments to ignite and study a large-scale fire inside an empty Cygnus resupply vehicle after it leaves the space station and before it re-enters Earth’s atmosphere to improving understanding of fire growth in microgravity and safeguarding future space missions.
  • Cool flames, an investigation into a phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot and then appear to go out — but actually continue to burn at a much lower temperature with no visible flames.
  • Controlled Dynamics locker- equipment that can minimize fluctuations and disturbances in the microgravity environment that can occur onboard a moving spacecraft that can enable a new class of research experiments.

NanoRacks Black Box- a platform that can provide advanced science capabilities and is specially designed for near-launch payload turnover of autonomous payloads including use of robotics, new automated MixStix and NanoLab-style research.

Written By: Mark Garcia NASA


UNIVERSAL DIGEST is pleased to be a conduit for some of NASA’s projects and work. This article and some others were written by NASA and are mostly unedited. We do not claim credit, we simply want to make them more available to the general public.

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DIGITAL MARS BY NASA

DIGITAL MARS BY NASA

In this digital technological age the inventions, improvements, and innovations continue at an evermore rapid pace! With Google Earth, there came such innovations as being able to ‘virtually’ visit areas and earth landmarks in such detail right from one’s own computer in a home environment. It is not only free, but educational and enjoyable and Google has taken a lot of time and investment in this venture.

Now, thanks to NASA, we can enjoy a similar, ‘digital’ visit to Mars without being there! How many of us would like to actually visit Mars? NASA JPL is now providing a Mars Trek similar in nature to Google Earth, but the agency has provided their own digital version for everyone to enjoy from a computer desktop, laptop, or smart phone. This program provides 2D and 3D (2 or 3 dimensional) imagery for all to enjoy. This program is spectacular, to say the least. With just a little time taken to take the tour provided in this program, one can enjoy some of the actual sites and landmarks that before now were only viewed in text or picture format, notwithstanding, Google Mars.

Please click the following link to “Mars Trek” where one may learn and utilize this digital tool. Courtesy: NASA JPL

http://marstrek.jpl.nasa.gov/

NASA has performed an amazing task in bringing this information to the public. They should be commended in their diligent work, striving to understand our own solar system and include the general population in the process.

Please click on the following YouTube ‘tutorial’ video courtesy of Ktm X:

As our knowledge grows in understanding our solar system and our place in it, future missions, as well as, current missions underway will no doubt bring us this understanding and we have NASA to thank for such hard work and an ongoing effort to continue space exploration to where, one day, we will actually make our way to the stars.

Universal Digest

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